Treasure Island

「宝島」島原石(安山岩)

white granite 250x100x50cm  2004

Treasure Island  2004
There was a forest where insects such as stag beetles lived near my house when I was a child. When I went into the forest to seach for them, I entered an immense world full of mystery and I was constantly in awe. One summer, I came home from Tokyo while I was a university student, and a barrier to prevent landslides in the forest was being constructed. The mossed face of the mountain was cut ,the trees were beaten down, and a power shovel strode in an arrogant manner. I was suprised at that time, that it was a very small space.My memory and my experience had been in a a huge and deep forest. Now the forest was levelled and the red earth was bared. Something that had seemed immense was reduced to a small red square. In that forest the world had quickly become small. People often say “ the world has become small” The spatial expanse that people can feel is quickly limited. In exchange for the material richness of modern civilization that people seek,what people have lost is immense.

There is a small island o sand which floats in the shallows of the sea. You are able to pass to this island during the ebb of low tide on foot. When you come look at a sculpture, if there is seawater between the island and the land you must wait until water recedes or take off your shoes and walk barefoot. You must confront a magnificent funtion of nature to see the sculpture. The viewer may feel inconvenience. However, I want you to take in the richness of the inconvience.
I made a group of ten sculptures which are full of a feeling of life. I made them with andesite stone from the recent volcano eruption in Shimabara. A veiw which may be familar is revitalized with the sculpture. The scenery shows an ever-changing expression with the rise and fall of the tide, and changes in the weather. The sculpture is buried in water during high tide, and the viewer has the opportunity to enjoy the beautiful seaside scenery again while seeing the sculpture underwater.

© 2018 by Senri Nojima